2018 Spring Nora Walsh-Battle Temple Japan Temple Semester

a night at the movies

After the first half of the week tricked me and the rest of Tokyo into thinking we were comfortably entrenched in spring, at last, the weekend brought a total reversion, complete with icy rain. Always one to let the weather get the best of me, I decided it was the perfect opportunity to catch a movie at one of the city’s many cinemas.

I had read about the extravagancies of Tokyo theaters, luxurious recliners and blankets and whole meals served during the show,  but no one in my immediate circle had gone to one yet so I would have to do further searching on my own. After reading through one article which listed theaters showing mostly arthouse or dated films in English, I felt like an idiot when I clicked on the Toho site on accident and discovered that just about every current U.S. release screened there is shown with English audio and Japanese subtitles.

Of course.

I settled on the Shinjuku location (known for a Godzilla head peaking out of its higher levels, Google it) and Black Panther for the movie. Although IMAX 3D and 3D MX4D (which purports to make the audience “feel” what happens on screen, something I’m not sure you’d want when watching a movie that is 75% punching but to each her own) weren’t much more than the standard showing, spanning a spectrum from 1,500 to 2,000yen, I decided to keep it simple. After classes on Friday, I set out from TUJ with three friends by my side for Shinjuku.

When we arrived to buy tickets at 5:45, with our showtime at 7, the rest of my party was a little anxious for reasons I couldn’t understand. We had an hour and fifteen minutes; what was there to stress about? As we purchased our tickets from the self-service kiosk, expressions of joy at the student discount quickly souring when it became clear there were almost no connecting seats left and those that remained were in the front row, I realized that seeing a movie in a small town is entirely different from seeing one in a big city. No chance of having the theater to yourself or waltzing in during the previews; seeing a movie in Tokyo requires planning.

We settled for the four connecting seats in the front and went to get dinner before the show, slightly worried by the number of moviegoers already camped out in the lobby when no new showings were being seated until 6:30, all times staggered by three hours instead of occurring according to running time. Upon our return, things had become even livelier and entrance was being permitted by theater number, not the free-flow common to U.S. theaters; ours was screen #4 and there must have been another film showing with four (yon) in the title because we twice queued up to enter after hearing yon only to be shooed away.

I had just entered the snack line when we were finally called and was haunted by my loss though pleased to see the front row wasn’t practically pressed against the screen like in U.S. theaters. Let me say, I have never in my life purchased movie snacks and was raised to bring a tote bag full of dollar store treats with me to all theatrical outings. But, I had my heart set on a reasonably priced churrito. So after ten minutes of trying to figure out the theater’s policy on re-entry (they hadn’t torn our tickets but it’s easy to seem suspicious as a foreigner, especially when tiptoeing around something you’re uncertain of, a self-fulfilling prophecy of sorts), I went for it.

IMG_2869Yes, I know this isn’t a Star Wars screening; let me wield my churrito in peace.

And, even if I had been questioned, it would still have been worth it.

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