2017 Fall Anitta Machanickal Temple Japan

A List of a Few Places to Visit in the Tokyo Area

All the Places to Explore Will Make Saying Goodbye so Hard

Before leaving for Japan, I had so many people ask me what countries were I going to visit while studying abroad. I told them that I’d be too busy exploring Japan to be leaving it. The truth though was less glamorous. I did not have enough money to be going to a foreign country every weekend. Besides, I may be in Japan but I was still here as a student. Meaning, I still had schoolwork to be doing. In the end, I did not end up leaving the Tokyo area (except for one trip I’m currently planning and will do in two weeks). Honestly, there’s nothing wrong with that. The Tokyo area has so much to offer, that I feel like I need another two months to visit every part of it. Probably a whole year. What I have seen so far has been gorgeous and exiting.

Asakusa

Asakusa is where I went for my first solo trip in Japan. I had originally gone to see the Sensō-ji temple. The temple was a bit of a let-down. It was such a tourist attraction, with way too many people crowded in to enjoy the experience of being at a temple. The streets of shops, on the other hand, were great to wander through. They sold a great variety of souvenirs and Japanese sweets (wagashi). It’s also really hard to get lost because apparently every one of those shopping streets somehow lead you back to the Sensō-ji temple. Either that, or my sense of direction is just that bad.

Shinjuku

I’m not much of a night life person, so if that’s what you want to know about, sorry, can’t help you. I did go out to Shinjuku at night once. While our planned activities turned out to be a bust, the lights and hustle and bustle of the people at night were well worth the trip. I was mostly satisfied with the amazing street magician we ended up seeing.

On a separate trip, I went to Shinjuku to see the Shinjuku Gyoen National Gardens. It costs 200 yen to enter but well worth the money. In fact, I feel like they are really underselling it because the views in that park are well worth 1000 yen, if not more.

Shibuya

Shibuya station is huge. There’s so much to see in Shibuya so if you’re ever in Tokyo, you will end up going there. My experiences involved shopping for the most part but from what I hear it’s where the clubbing happens.

Yokohama

My first trip to Yokohama, I ended up going to Yamashita Park and walking alongside Ōsanbashi Pier. The waterside view was stunning. My second trip, I explored Yokohama’s Chinatown with a friend. Japan’s Chinatown is very different that the Chinatowns I’ve visited. The Chinatown in Chicago is Americanized but many Chinese people visit Chinatown and shops are more catered to Chinese Americans. Japan’s Chinatown felt like it was catered toward the Japanese. That comparison made visiting Yokohama’s Chinatown interesting.

Ueno Park

Ueno Park is a gigantic park with a zoo and a ton of museums. You can do what I did and just wander or you can visit the zoo or one of the museums. A great tip for those wanted to save some cash: bring your own food. A easy way to spice up the trip is to give yourself a little picnic at these great scenic spots. Not a great cook? That’s fine, then just buy a meal at the conbini and bring it with you.

Shimokitazawa

A great place for thrift shopping. Harajuku Chicago is a great shop to use as a starting point. The area around it has a great many thrift stores. It was amazing how many cute outfits I was able to buy for cheap.

 

Ginza and Kamakura are on my list and I plan to go in the next few weeks (the former for kabuki and the latter for the shrines). If you’re like me and are already stretching your wallet by coming to Japan don’t fret so much about travel. As you can see, there’s still plenty to do right within Tokyo.

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The entrance to Yokohama’s Chinatown

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